Advancements in weather resistive barrier sheets

In this webinar Mike Sloggatt discusses weather resistive barrier (WRB) sheets, a vital part of an exterior wall system that protects a structure from water intrusion, improving building durability, enhancing energy efficiency and decreasing maintenance costs. Mike will also present the benefits of fully-adhered WRBs, the latest generation of weather resistive barriers.

Speaker Bio:

Mike Sloggatt has more than thirty year's experience, and specializes in high-end, challenging remodels near his home on Long Island. He is a frequent contributor to the Journal of Light Construction magazine and writes for Fine Homebuilding and Tools of the Trade, in addition to moderating the JLC Rough Carpentry Forum. For the past four years, Mike has been the Frame-to-Finish (Rough) Carpentry presenter for the Katz Roadshow. He teaches seminars and clinics in all aspects of carpentry and remodeling and is a regular presenter at JLC Live, The Remodeling Show and International Builders’ Show.

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Innovative Thomas & Betts electrical boxes save time and energy, while making a quality installation

Homeowners today demand increased energy efficiency, and T&B has responded with the Carlon® DraftTight® Non-Metallic Box for new construction and DraftTight® Old Work Box for existing structures. Their innovative designs feature gaskets and a flexible drywall flange over cable-entry points to seal against airflow. By eliminating the need to caulk the boxes after installation, contractors can save about five hours of installation time on a 2,200 square-foot house. Read more.

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Increase efficiency and safety with Thomas & Betts Outdoor While-In-Use-Covers and Cable Ties

Thomas & Betts (T&B) product lines for residential construction make installation quicker and easier for the contractor, and also deliver energy efficiency, safety and durability to the homeowner. T&B products reduce installation time, while complying with U.S. building and electrical codes, International Energy Conservation Code® (IECC®) requirements and insulation standards. Here are just a few new products from T&B to help save you time and increase efficiency.

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Neighborhood Renewal through Lasting Community Partnerships

Camden is regularly cited as one of the most impoverished cities in the U.S. It also features low high school graduation rates, high unemployment and residents dedicated to changing that. Hundreds of residents created a non-profit group to better their community, starting with a vision statement and mission, they have succeeded. This unit describes the steps taken to start revitalizing the Parkside neighborhood in Camden, Mass., through community engagement.

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The New Sustain-Ability: Design for All Abilities

This course looks closely at the definition and background of Universal Design. It gets you thinking broadly about sustainability, while covering the seven principles of universal design. Finally, it discusses sustainability in practice with universal design.

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Insights on Multifamily Benchmarking from EPA & Fannie Mae

There is an increasing demand for performance data in the green marketplace. But it’s been difficult to quantify, normalize and put a label on performance across building types, occupancy types, locations, and amenities. ENERGY STAR has partnered to create a performance scale for multifamily spaces. This program discusses the importance of benchmarking from performance and financial perspectives for developers, owners, property managers, designers, and tenants.

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Paseo Verde: Case Study of a LEED ND & Homes Mixed-Use TOD

Paseo Verde is the first LEED Platinum ND project completed in North America. Stakeholders from the project talk in detail about the planning, design, construction, and initial performance of this one-of-a-kind project. The “moving pieces” of this project were unique and allowed opportunities for neighborhood and community improvement that may not be duplicated.

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The Light Stuff: Energy-efficient Lighting for a Healing Environment

This course looks at the advancements and opportunities for providing energy-efficient lighting in a 24/7 environment such as a hospital. The course discusses concepts such as harvesting daylighting, which looks at the amount of lighting in a space to determine when electrical light doesn’t need to be on; tones of white light; color temperature; spectral power distribution; and color rendering of white light. The healing and emotional power of lighting is examined through various case studies such as the National Intrepid Center of Excellence, Bethesda, Maryland, a rehab center for solders suffering traumatic brain injury who are easily disoriented triggered by light, the Loyola Bone Marrow Treatment Facility Renovation, Maywood, Illinois; and the Banner Page Hospital Emergency Department addition, Page, Arizona. Lighting solutions are proposed such as minimal interior contrast, no point lighting, creating wayfinding with sconces, and using passive light.

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Let There Be Daylight: Deploying Advanced Daylight Controls

This course looks at the results of a recent report called Let There Be Daylight, the result of retrofitting daylight controls in New York City office buildings. Lighting is the largest electric end use of a building and New York City’s new lighting laws will drive massive retrofit activity in its commercial buildings. The course discusses the process and challenges of measuring and verifying lighting and shading controls, the energy and cost benefits of daylighting, deploying daylighting technologies and components, and the role of operations and building management in the success of such systems. Wrong ways to daylight a building such as over-glazing it, ignoring shading and glare control, and skipping automated controls are examined along with GSA’s Proving Ground data that looks at its own energy savings from lighting controls, along with case studies such as the New York Times Headquarters Building and the Time Warner Center retrofit, which reduced its lighting energy by 55 percent.

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After the Storm: Recovering (Materials) from a Natural Disaster

This course looks at how to create opportunities for material reuse on projects during construction of after natural disasters. The course discusses how to specify, re-certify and incorporate reclaimed materials into renovations or new construction (and how to plan for material storage and protection until needed) without negatively affecting the environmental, economic and social fabric of the existing community. The disasters in New Orleans and Greensburg, Kansas, are examined along with the types of materials that can be reused such as brick, masonry, access flooring, structural steel, reclaimed doors, carpet tile, gym flooring, light fixtures, and furniture.

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