Concrete Innovations (Print Course)

Concrete is the material of choice for the tallest buildings in the world and infrastructure designed to last centuries. To meet demands for these cutting-edge projects, concrete must be stronger, more durable and more workable than ever before. This article explores how new products, manufacturing methods and research are developing innovative concretes to meet these new challenges. Bendable concrete, smog eating concrete and carbon capture are just a few examples of new technologies enhancing a product that is nearly 5,000 years in development.

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Pathway to Resilience (Print Course)

Over the past several decades, there has been a continuous increase in human and economic loss from disaster events. The rise in disasters and their consequences is related to a rise in people’s vulnerability, induced by human development. However, examples of resiliency planning and more stringent building code requirements still lag. This article will offer a view on emerging risks and opportunities as human and economic losses from disasters increase, with the overarching goal of supporting and advancing resilience in future construction of buildings and critical infrastructure.

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Concrete Pathways to Net Zero: Part 1, Embodied Carbon (Print Course)

For years, much of the architecture, engineering, and construction community has been focused on reducing operational carbon. More recently, the detrimental effects of embodied carbon emissions on the environment have become pronounced, and nations, organizations, and individuals are turning their attention to the ways in which embodied carbon can be reduced or eliminated.

This course analyzes concrete’s role in achieving net zero carbon emissions by assessing material innovation, the impact of prescriptive and performance specifications on the environment, and the use of whole building life cycle assessments to reduce the carbon footprint of buildings.

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Concrete Pathways to Net Zero: Part 2, Operational Carbon (Print Course)

Many countries, regions, cities, and organizations around the world are striving to reduce carbon emissions in an effort to mitigate climate change and its effects. Globally, operational carbon, which occurs from lighting, heating, and cooling buildings and homes, is responsible for 28% of annual CO2 emissions. Because buildings play a large role in carbon emissions, architects, engineers, and other building professionals are in a unique position to aid reduction efforts.

This course will enable learners to assess the role of concrete in carbon reduction strategies and the ways in which concrete can support sustainability initiatives. With a focus on operational carbon, this course will also examine Passive House, the Net Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment, Race to Zero, and Architecture 2030, as well as several case studies. For information on embodied carbon, learners should refer to the course Concrete Pathways to Net Zero: Part 1, Embodied Carbon.

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