Housing's Next Frontier

Net Zero Homes are estimated to grow 33% from 2015-2016 alone, but why are they accounting for less than 1% of the U.S. housing stock?
Learn how you can boost your sales of Net Zero homes!

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DOE: Building America Solution Center - Energy Star Windows

Select and install high-performance windows, preferably windows that are ENERGY STAR rated or that meet or exceed the ENERGY STAR program requirements for windows, doors, and skylights. If you are seeking certification under the ENERGY STAR Certified Homes program or the U.S. Department of Energy's Zero Energy Ready Home program, read this for more specific guidance.

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DOE: Characterization of Energy Savings and Thermal Comfort Improvements Derived from Using Interior Storm Windows

This report records the results of a field study conducted in a historic home in Seattle, Washington, to document the performance of interior storm window inserts. The energy use and thermal performance of the house were monitored before and after the installation of the inserts. Using the defined analysis approach, it was determined that the interior storm windows produced a 22% reduction in heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning energy use and reduced building envelope leakage by 8.6%. Learn more.

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Innovative Materials Help Energy Innovation Center Earn LEED Platinum Certification and Historic Tax Credits (Print Course)

The newly renovated, LEED Platinum Energy Innovation Center (EIC), is a collaborative hub that supports the Pittsburgh region’s emerging clean technologies. High-tech building materials can be found throughout the historic facility, showcasing chemistry as a sustainable solution and helping the Energy Innovation Center maintain its sustainable footprint.

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Why Exceed the Code: Maximizing Energy and Cost Savings in Pipe Insulation

Thermal insulation aids in stabilizing process temperatures; can minimize moisture condensation on below ambient temperature piping surfaces; increases fire protection; and contributes to noise abatement. Personnel protection against burn injury is a major benefit from thermal insulation. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires that “all exposed steam and hot-water pipes within 7 feet of the floor or working platform or within 15 inches measured horizontally from stairways, ramps, or fixed ladders shall be covered with an insulating material, or guarded in such manner as to prevent contact. In addition, the Insulation Institute provides other succinct reasons for insulating pipes beyond many current state and local code thickness requirements.

ASHRAE 90.1 minimum pipe insulation thicknesses are required for compliance with energy-efficient building design relative to many new buildings, building additions, and retrofit construction. A vapor retarder, which is required in addition to the insulation, will further reduce the likelihood of corrosion due to condensation on cold pipes. Finally, while insulation cannot prevent standing water in pipes from freezing, it can slow the process. This course will enable learners to analyze material types that may ultimately affect the long-term safety and wellness of occupants. By thoroughly examining ASHRAE 90.1, the need for building professionals to exceed the local code requirements will become apparent. Finally, the course will focus on utilizing software to specify pipe insulation, which will influence the project budget, energy-efficiency of a structure, and the long-term safety and wellness of occupants.

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