Minimizing and Controlling Concrete Cracking Due to Shrinkage

Cracked concrete can lead to safety issues, water leakage, durability problems, shortened service life, poor aesthetics, and costly repairs. Minimizing cracking is a challenge, but fortunately, there are options to minimize and control concrete cracking. Concrete cracks because it fails in tension; and a common cause is shrinkage. This presentation will describe typical influencing factors that lead to concrete shrinkage, plus options and construction practices that can mitigate shrinkage to control cracking. This presentation will provide information that architects, engineers, and specifiers can use to enhance project specifications to help ensure more sustainable, and durable concrete construction.

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Reducing Joint Maintenance Costs by Extending Joint Spacing in Concrete Slabs-on-Ground

This course will address the need for joints in concrete, while reviewing and explaining the current joint spacing recommendations. It will highlight the different options for extending joint spacing by showing some example projects. This course will also discuss the theory for using extended joint spacing in concrete slabs today.

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Introduction to Caulks and Sealants

By the end of this course you will be able to identify and discuss proper and safe joint sealant application procedures. You will also be able to recognize and understand the different causes for common sealant problems. Finally, you will also be able to compare and contrast different sealant types.

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Floor Surface Treatments

This course will describe why concrete floors need proper curing. This course will also cover the different types of surface treatments available and discuss their benefits. Finally, we will wrap up this course by looking at the proper installation of flooring treatments, including both proper surface preparation and how to correctly specify.

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Building Materials Matter – Life-Cycle View Supports Informed Choices, Contributes to Sustainable Design (Online Version)

A focus on energy efficiency has led to widespread improvements in structural building materials. With an abundance of information and competing environmental claims, determining a material’s true impacts is a challenge. This course examines materials throughout their life cycles and focuses on international research supporting the use of wood while considering some advantages of concrete and steel; it also touches on efforts of all three industries to lessen environmental impacts.

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Building Materials Matter - Life Cycle View Supports Informed Choices, Contributes to Sustainable Design (Print Course)

A focus on energy efficiency has led to widespread improvements in structural building materials. With an abundance of information and competing environmental claims, determining a material’s true impacts is a challenge. This course examines materials throughout their life cycles and focuses on international research supporting the use of wood while considering some advantages of concrete and steel; it also touches on efforts of all three industries to lessen environmental impacts.

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Concrete's Contribution to LEED v4 (Print Course)

LEED v4 includes advancements that will change the way design professionals, contractors and product manufacturers do business. Many credits, such as Rainwater Management, Heat Island Reduction and Optimized Energy Performance are refined. Others, such as Material and Resource (MR) credits, challenge product manufacturers to disclose their environmental, social and health impacts in third-party validated reports. This article reveals strategies using concrete that yield successful results in achieving sustainability goals.

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Architectural Cast-In-Place Concrete and White Cement

Material selection is one of the most important choices you will make to the overall outcome of your construction projects. Understanding how different material options impact your bottom line leads to better informed decision-making. This course highlights the advantages that durable, non-combustible, low-maintenance materials and finishes bring to your projects, why architectural and decorative concrete is the smart choice for buildings and floors, and why concrete is a sustainable option.

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Insulating Concrete Forms for Multifamily Residential Construction (Print Course)

This article provides guidance for architects, engineers and builders on how to design and build high performance reinforced concrete multifamily residential buildings using Insulating Concrete Forms (ICFs). Combining the strength and durability of reinforced concrete with the versatility of highly engineered rigid insulation, ICFs provide ideal solutions for apartments, condos, hotels, dormitories and assisted living facilities. With increased attention to occupant safety and comfort, design professionals can take advantage of concrete’s inherent fire resistance and noise reduction qualities, important features when designing multifamily residential buildings. This article will address how the thermal properties of ICFs, combining the high R-value of rigid insulation with the thermal mass of concrete, offer building owners significant energy savings over the long term. The article will also provide guidance on how to minimize the cost of ICF concrete construction to take full advantage of these benefits, resulting in investments that are secure and generate long-term value to building owners.

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High Performance Waterproofing Solutions for Shotcrete Foundations

This course will discuss the use of shotcrete for structural applications, specifically in below-grade foundation walls. While the use of shotcrete is proven to accelerate construction schedules up to 25%, experience has shown that there are risks associated with this method of concrete placement versus traditional cast-in-place walls. During this session, we will cover the benefits and risks associated with shotcrete, how pre-applied waterproofing membrane systems should be designed for critical applications and the challenges that traditional waterproofing membranes face when used with shotcrete construction.

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