Integrating Structural Elements for Innovative Design (Print Course)

Architectural design has grown increasingly complex with the evolution of structural technology. Successful architects embrace and emphasize structural elements to articulate their ideas and define space. However, increasing complexity also presents numerous design, workflow, and communication challenges as well as opportunities for progressive and transformative built environments.

This course will explore how architects can use BIM software to take their ideas from concept to refinement to presentation and implementation while benefiting from seamless workflow, collaboration, and communication. The CEU will also address the various issues associated with modern building practices and structural complexity and present examples of projects that exemplify a structure-based process and mindset.

Take Course to Earn: AIA Credit: 1 LU/HSW

Register

Thermal Bridging Solutions to Improve Building Envelope Performance

Thermal bridging is a big concern in the building industry, it has been recognized as a significant factor in building envelope heat loss. By reducing heat flow through a building’s thermal envelope we can reduce energy consumption as well as prevent potential condensation issues. Building codes have increased requirements of building enclosures requiring ‘continuous insulation’ without thermal bridging. Thermal break materials can be used to reduce heat loss in wall assemblies, transitions and structural connections throughout the building envelope. They can minimize building energy loss and improve building envelope performance.

This course will provide an overview to thermal bridging, discussing the reasons why it occurs as well as how it can be prevented. This course will also compare building details with and without thermal break solutions to highlight the importance of determining accurate values of thermal transmittance.

Register

After the Storm: Recovering (Materials) from a Natural Disaster

This course looks at how to create opportunities for material reuse on projects during construction of after natural disasters. The course discusses how to specify, re-certify and incorporate reclaimed materials into renovations or new construction (and how to plan for material storage and protection until needed) without negatively affecting the environmental, economic and social fabric of the existing community. The disasters in New Orleans and Greensburg, Kansas, are examined along with the types of materials that can be reused such as brick, masonry, access flooring, structural steel, reclaimed doors, carpet tile, gym flooring, light fixtures, and furniture.

Register

High Performance Precast Concrete Building Enclosures (PRINT)

When you ask architects today about some of their biggest challenges; and building enclosure design is usually at, or towards the top of the list. New and more stringent codes are requiring designers to have a deeper understanding of enclosure systems. High performance building designs are becoming essential to meet new code requirements, as well as the expectations of funding entities, owners, and developers. State-of-the-art building designs require high performance building materials and building enclosure systems. High performance materials must be efficient and versatile in use and in operation, as well as durable, resilient, and capable of protecting buildings and building occupants from weather extremes, natural and man-made hazards, and environmental concerns.

Register

In Floor Cellular Raceway Systems (IFCRS) - Creating Integrated Designs

This course will provide an overview of the in floor cellular raceway system including features and benefits, components and installation, sustainability, design criteria, product specifications and applications.

Register

Rebuilding Ground Zero with Doka Formwork

Ground Zero Building Professionals from Navillus Concrete and Roger and Sons Concrete share their experiences working with innovative concrete formwork systems on the 9/11 Memorial and Tower 4 projects at the World Trade Center construction site.

View Now

The Burke Lockable Dowel - Revolutionizing the Post Tension Process

Imagine a post-tension concrete project with no pour strips, improved job site safety, and a process that eliminates approximately 30 days of construction time. View this quick step-by-step animation of a slab-to-wall installation.

View Now

Revolutionizing Post-Tension Precast Concrete

Save a significant amount of time and materials over other construction methods with the use of Burke Lockable Dowels. Improve site access, minimize formwork requirements, and accelerate the rate of construction.

Get Whitepaper

Burke Lockable Dowel Fast Facts

The Burke Lockable Dowel eliminates the need for unsafe, costly and disruptive pour strips. In most cases, project schedules may be cut by up to 30 days or more. Review some of these fast facts.

View Now

Goodbye Pour Strips: Post-Tensioned Breakthrough Now Available in the US

Burke Lockable Dowel system is transformative—allowing for quicker delivery schedules and needless disruption. No pour strips. No safety worries. No shoring or cleaning.

View Now