Concrete Pathways to Net Zero: Part 1, Embodied Carbon (Print Course)

For years, much of the architecture, engineering, and construction community has been focused on reducing operational carbon. More recently, the detrimental effects of embodied carbon emissions on the environment have become pronounced, and nations, organizations, and individuals are turning their attention to the ways in which embodied carbon can be reduced or eliminated.

This course analyzes concrete’s role in achieving net zero carbon emissions by assessing material innovation, the impact of prescriptive and performance specifications on the environment, and the use of whole building life cycle assessments to reduce the carbon footprint of buildings.

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A Case for Concrete: Let's Talk About Strength

An inspiring look at what makes concrete one of the strongest, most durable and resilient building materials on earth.

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Hazard Mitigation: Build With Strength

Extreme weather events costs the US billions in recovery every year. Find out why building a resilient structure pays off.

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What Makes ICFs Better

Working with concrete doesn’t get any easier than this. With insulated concrete forms (ICFs), you get strength, flexibility and cost-efficiency all in one method. Once you use it, you’ll see why so many builders adopt the technique – and never look back.

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Ready. Set. Build.

Dr. Jeremy Gregory, MIT research scientist and executive director of the Concrete Sustainability Hub, discusses how the versatility of concrete results in a range of performance benefits.

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Build a More Sustainable Future

Concrete gives you a lasting return on investment. Nothing is stronger, more durable or more versatile. To build a more sustainable future, we build with concrete.

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Making the Business Case for Building with Insulated Concrete Forms: Energy, Safety, and Savings (Print Course)

Combining the strength and durability of reinforced concrete with high performance rigid insulation, insulated concrete forms (ICFs) provide ideal solutions for developers of apartments, condos, hotels, dormitories, and assisted living facilities.

ICFs are cost competitive with wood frame construction on a first-cost basis and offer operational cost savings through lower energy bills and reduced insurance costs among other benefits such as fire resistance and noise reduction. This article makes the business case for building multi-family homes with ICFs.

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The Form and Function of Decorative Concrete (Print Course)

Decorative concrete encompasses everything from overlays, inlays, mosaics, stamped concrete, and cast-in-place concrete amongst others. It can be used for swimming pool decks, as highly durable polished floors, and in a variety of vertical applications. Board-formed cast-in-place concrete can function both structurally and aesthetically, and masters such as Ando, Calatrava, and Kahn have mastered its use.

By understanding and analyzing the form and function of decorative concrete, as well as its benefits, limitations, and legacy, architects and other specifiers, will be better equipped to make innovative design decisions.

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The Top 10 Ways to Reduce Concrete’s Carbon Footprint (Print Course)

Concrete is the building block of modern society and the most widely used building material. Nearly every structure built today, including buildings, bridges, homes, and infrastructure uses concrete in some way. It provides us with shelter along with places to work, learn and play. It connects us through roads and rapid transit and airports. Water is delivered and treated in concrete structures. Concrete is economical, available everywhere, durable, and versatile.

As demand for building construction continues to increase, it is likely the demand for concrete will also increase. Like all building products, however, concrete has a carbon footprint. This course will analyze the top ten strategies to take advantage of concrete’s benefits while ensuring the lowest possible carbon footprint.

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Strength Through Transparency: How Concrete EPDs are Driving Down Carbon Footprint (Print Course)

Concrete is the most commonly used man-made material and comes second only to water as the most widely used substance on earth. It can be found in nearly every building project, from structural components to sidewalks and parking lots. As populations continue to grow and the building sector continues to experience exponential growth, the concrete industry is taking the lead in driving initiatives toward a sustainable future through transparency and innovative concrete solutions.

By better understanding concepts and terminology relevant to a sustainable future; assessing LEED v4, ASHRAE 189.1, and the International Green Construction Code; learning how to specify concrete for LEEDv4; and discovering innovative concrete technologies and products, those in the AEC industry will be better positioned to achieve carbon emissions reduction goals and contribute to the creation of a more sustainable built environment.

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