5 Critical Take-Aways from the 2020 BUILDER Concept Home

Hear Sekisui House, Ltd., Marketing General Manager Norio Adachi on what bringing Chōwa to the United States market means to Sekisui House, its leaders, its partners, and its worldwide team of associates.

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Engaging Clients: Communication Strategies for Better Project Management

Communication is a key, but often overlooked, aspect of the architect’s role. Understanding what constitutes effective communication, as well as having an awareness of the tools that can aid communication, can enhance the architect’s role and enable projects to run more smoothly. Effective communication can also translate to more satisfied clients, repeat business, and projects that remain on-time and on-budget.

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Designing with Light: Adding Function and Beauty with Extruded Aluminum Channels for Tape

Lighting, perhaps one of the most overlooked elements of the design process, has the ability to affect occupancy mood, productivity, and ability to learn. Building professionals and designers have the ability to use new technology and lighting features to affect mood while enhancing the value and the aesthetic appeal of a space in residential and commercial design.


This course will introduce you to best practices for lighting design and technology for lighting. In addition, the course will demonstrate the functions of new LED technology when incorporated with extruded aluminum tape channels to increase the versatility of a space, as well as improve ambience.

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Designing for a Lifetime: How to Specify Timeless and Trendy Products (Print Course)

This course will provide architects and designers with knowledge that will enhance their ability to identify key trends in kitchen design and product specification. Specifying products for clients that are both timeless and trendy drives client satisfaction and enhances the project portfolio.

By examining feedback from industry experts regarding the future of kitchen design, this course will demonstrate how to effectively incorporate space planning, appliances, connectivity, and technology into the project.

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Precision and Performance with Manufactured Stone Veneer

Manufactured stone veneer is an inspirational design element, born from innovative technology and creative solutions. Also known as MSV, manufactured stone veneer is a lightweight, non-load bearing building material used as a decorative wall covering for exterior or interior surfaces in both residential and commercial construction.

Manufactured stone veneer products adhere to any structurally sound surface and require a simple installation process of lath, scratch coat, mortar, and grout. Each color and texture uses a blend of Portland cement, lightweight natural aggregates, and iron oxide pigments. Even on close examination, manufactured stone looks and feels like natural stone.

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The Benefits of Specifying Low-e Coatings

This course will discuss the benefits of specifying high-performance architectural glass to improve the energy efficiency of buildings while reducing their operating costs and carbon emissions. An understanding of solar energy spectrum and common glass performance measures, in addition to the manufacturing processes for pyrolytic and magnetron sputter vacuum disposition low e-coating. The course will help learners to differentiate between passive and solar control low-e coatings and different glass performance measures. Finally, the course will analyze how low-e coatings can improve energy efficiency and assist with earning LEED credit contributions.

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Benefits of High-Performance Windows in Historic Preservation and Renovation (Print Course)

Historic preservation projects require a significant amount of care and attention to detail. Although window replacements are traditionally seen as a last resort to repair and ongoing maintenance, working with the right partners can improve the building’s energy efficiency while preserving its legacy. Windows can have the most significant architectural impact on a building’s aesthetics, and architects and designers should understand how to balance the needs of multiple stakeholders. This is achieved through knowledge of windows’ role in both sustainability and preservation, increased building operational efficiency, various design options to meet strict historic renovation criteria, and how to manage federal, state, and local building codes and tax incentives.

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Affordable and Low-Maintenance Dark Windows

In the past, darker window frames were limited to painted wood, aluminum, aluminum-clad, or composite material frames due to the higher price point. Affordable, low-maintenance materials such as vinyl were limited to white and tan because of the colors’ low reflectivity and resistance to heat build-up from sun exposure. However, advances in vinyl pigments and new, thermal-resistant paints now provide architects with a wider array of dark colored window material options that are more affordable. This course will explore the basic aesthetics and trends of dark colors and provide a detailed discussion of choosing available dark window styles.

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SPECIFYING HIGH PERFORMING VENTILATION FOR LUXURY KITCHENS

Ventilation is a vitally important factor in the design, construction and operation of luxury kitchens. Without adequate ventilation and an ample supply of clean makeup air, no kitchen will operate efficiently or safely for the occupants.

This course will discuss the different types of ventilation systems available and how to incorporate ventilation without sacrificing design and style. In addition, the course will address importance of ventilation for the space and occupant health.

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The Surfaces that Surround Us While We Heal (Print Course)

The mission of healthcare organizations is to provide patient care that is effective, medically relevant, and operationally efficient in a comfortable, convenient environment where the patient-provider relationship is at the center. Surfaces play a key role in creating a positive tone within healthcare built environments, but surface quality is dependent on proper material selection, durability of design, and material performance. Designers must understand how to specify surfaces in healthcare settings that address disinfection, durability, and design challenges to achieve safety, efficiency, and patient comfort.

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