Designing Building Spaces that Integrate Building Design and the Outdoors with Oversized Fenestration Products (Print Course)

Finding ways to bring the outdoors inside is a modern building design trend that continues to influence the specification process. Consumers’ desire to blend nature with the built environment incorporates a desire to increase the amount of natural lighting and nature inside the home or commercial space.

Research continues to evolve demonstrating the need for nature to be incorporated in the built environment, not simply as a luxury, but as an investment in health and productivity. Mounting pressure for building and design professionals to not only meet LEED standards and current codes, but exceed them, continues to leverage the need for sustainability, green building manufacturing, and products that address the needs and wants of the consumer.

Up until recently, it can be said that only luxury markets could afford the type of oversized windows and doors that permit the most amount of sunlight due to intricate design, complicated installation, and maintenance of oversized windows and doors. However, new products on the market are making this design and lifestyle trend more accessible and with more choices than ever.

Register

High Tech Wood Windows: Design Challenges and Solutions

Wood windows remain immensely popular with designers and homeowners alike and have evolved over the decades. They are remarkable for their warmth and aesthetic appeal. The modern versions are also more impervious to environmental conditions and can achieve extremely high energy saving ratings with high-tech glass. Most importantly, wood windows have design flexibility that can accomplish the aesthetic program of any architectural style, from contemporary to traditional to ornate and custom.

This course teaches designers what is possible when wood windows are specified, and delves into how the wood for these windows is grown and then used in manufacturing for durability and conservation.

The course discusses how wood treatments have evolved to the superior state of strength possible today and explains how windows are tested and rated. These principles are illustrated via case studies showing the potential for wood windows specified to satisfy modern architectural challenges.

Register

Benefits of High-Performance Windows in Historic Preservation and Renovation (Print Course)

Historic preservation projects require a significant amount of care and attention to detail. Although window replacements are traditionally seen as a last resort to repair and ongoing maintenance, working with the right partners can improve the building’s energy efficiency while preserving its legacy. Windows can have the most significant architectural impact on a building’s aesthetics, and architects and designers should understand how to balance the needs of multiple stakeholders. This is achieved through knowledge of windows’ role in both sustainability and preservation, increased building operational efficiency, various design options to meet strict historic renovation criteria, and how to manage federal, state, and local building codes and tax incentives.

Register

Affordable and Low-Maintenance Dark Windows

In the past, darker window frames were limited to painted wood, aluminum, aluminum-clad, or composite material frames due to the higher price point. Affordable, low-maintenance materials such as vinyl were limited to white and tan because of the colors’ low reflectivity and resistance to heat build-up from sun exposure. However, advances in vinyl pigments and new, thermal-resistant paints now provide architects with a wider array of dark colored window material options that are more affordable. This course will explore the basic aesthetics and trends of dark colors and provide a detailed discussion of choosing available dark window styles.

Register

An Introduction to Electrochromic Glass: What It is and How It Works (Print Course)

Electrochromic glass is a smart solution for buildings in which solar control is a challenge, including classroom settings, healthcare facilities, commercial offices, retail spaces, museums and cultural institutions. Interior spaces featuring an atrium or skylights also benefit from the use of smart glass. Electrochromic glass maintains access to daylight and outdoor views, which are linked to faster rates of learning and patient recovery, improved emotional wellness, increased productivity and reduced employee absenteeism. Not only does electrochromic glass offer design flexibility and occupant benefits, it also contributes to sustainability goals and energy savings.

Register

Discover New Technologies and Benefits of Decorative Glass for Interior and Exterior Applications (Print Course)

Emerging technologies are revolutionizing the architectural glass industry and are providing architects and designers with an unprecedented level of design flexibility and customization.

This CEU will explore new frontiers in glass technology. It will also discuss how architects and designers can incorporate decorative glass to create more sustainable, productive, and health-promoting interior and exterior environments.

Register

Commercial Fire-Rated Aluminum Glazing Systems

This course will help educate the architect about alternative fire-rated window, door, and vision or glass wall materials currently available in commercial construction. The learning unit will summarize the history of this evolution and compare some of the different designs that are available to the architect today. It will also explore examples of how fire-rated aluminum glazing systems can be incorporated while addressing some of the common code considerations.

Register

How Vinyl Window & Door Products Meet the Unique Goals of Multifamily Housing Projects

This course will explore the benefits of using vinyl window products to meet the unique goals of multifamily housing. It will also provide guidelines to help architects specify vinyl window systems that best meet a project’s performance, aesthetic needs, and budget criteria while benefiting the owners, occupants, and the environment.

Register

Achieving the Look of Historic Windows in New Design and Construction

Window details play a large part in determining the character and aesthetics of building design. When the look of an historic building is desired, the designer must pay attention to lite size, aspect ratio, lite patterns, casing, sill detail, and muntin selection of the window. This course explains and illustrates the details of historic windows to help designers specify for and achieve a traditional design.

Register

Understanding and Specifying with WDMA’s Architectural Door Standards

Architectural wood flush and architectural wood stile and rail doors are part of a superior interior built environment, and now there are improved standards to guide your specifications. The industry overhauled interior architectural door standards, ANSI/WDMA I.S. 1A-2013 and ANSI/WDMA I.S. 6A-2013, to provide a greater focus on performance-driven specifications.

This course will describe the standards, including performance duty levels, aesthetics, construction and finishes for architectural wood doors.

Register