Benefits of High-Performance Windows in Historic Preservation and Renovation (Print Course)

Historic preservation projects require a significant amount of care and attention to detail. Although window replacements are traditionally seen as a last resort to repair and ongoing maintenance, working with the right partners can improve the building’s energy efficiency while preserving its legacy. Windows can have the most significant architectural impact on a building’s aesthetics, and architects and designers should understand how to balance the needs of multiple stakeholders. This is achieved through knowledge of windows’ role in both sustainability and preservation, increased building operational efficiency, various design options to meet strict historic renovation criteria, and how to manage federal, state, and local building codes and tax incentives.

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Affordable and Low-Maintenance Dark Windows

In the past, darker window frames were limited to painted wood, aluminum, aluminum-clad, or composite material frames due to the higher price point. Affordable, low-maintenance materials such as vinyl were limited to white and tan because of the colors’ low reflectivity and resistance to heat build-up from sun exposure. However, advances in vinyl pigments and new, thermal-resistant paints now provide architects with a wider array of dark colored window material options that are more affordable. This course will explore the basic aesthetics and trends of dark colors and provide a detailed discussion of choosing available dark window styles.

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An Introduction to Electrochromic Glass: What It is and How It Works (Print Course)

Electrochromic glass is a smart solution for buildings in which solar control is a challenge, including classroom settings, healthcare facilities, commercial offices, retail spaces, museums and cultural institutions. Interior spaces featuring an atrium or skylights also benefit from the use of smart glass. Electrochromic glass maintains access to daylight and outdoor views, which are linked to faster rates of learning and patient recovery, improved emotional wellness, increased productivity and reduced employee absenteeism. Not only does electrochromic glass offer design flexibility and occupant benefits, it also contributes to sustainability goals and energy savings.

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Discover New Technologies and Benefits of Decorative Glass for Interior and Exterior Applications (Print Course)

Emerging technologies are revolutionizing the architectural glass industry and are providing architects and designers with an unprecedented level of design flexibility and customization.

This CEU will explore new frontiers in glass technology. It will also discuss how architects and designers can incorporate decorative glass to create more sustainable, productive, and health-promoting interior and exterior environments.

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Commercial Fire-Rated Aluminum Glazing Systems

This course will help educate the architect about alternative fire-rated window, door, and vision or glass wall materials currently available in commercial construction. The learning unit will summarize the history of this evolution and compare some of the different designs that are available to the architect today. It will also explore examples of how fire-rated aluminum glazing systems can be incorporated while addressing some of the common code considerations.

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How Vinyl Window & Door Products Meet the Unique Goals of Multifamily Housing Projects

This course will explore the benefits of using vinyl window products to meet the unique goals of multifamily housing. It will also provide guidelines to help architects specify vinyl window systems that best meet a project’s performance, aesthetic needs, and budget criteria while benefiting the owners, occupants, and the environment.

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Achieving the Look of Historic Windows in New Design and Construction

Window details play a large part in determining the character and aesthetics of building design. When the look of an historic building is desired, the designer must pay attention to lite size, aspect ratio, lite patterns, casing, sill detail, and muntin selection of the window. This course explains and illustrates the details of historic windows to help designers specify for and achieve a traditional design.

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Understanding and Specifying with WDMA’s Architectural Door Standards

Architectural wood flush and architectural wood stile and rail doors are part of a superior interior built environment, and now there are improved standards to guide your specifications. The industry overhauled interior architectural door standards, ANSI/WDMA I.S. 1A-2013 and ANSI/WDMA I.S. 6A-2013, to provide a greater focus on performance-driven specifications.

This course will describe the standards, including performance duty levels, aesthetics, construction and finishes for architectural wood doors.

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Manufacturing Windows and Doors: What Qualifies as Sustainable?

This course examines what makes a window truly sustainable. We discuss the important aspect of energy efficiency, but have deepened our study of sustainability to include a manufacturer’s attention to resource efficiency, to occupant health, and to durability. When all four factors are robustly addressed by a manufacturer, the windows and doors that company produces will more fully embrace the spirit of sustainability that green-leaning architects want for their buildings.

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Windows and Doors For Coastal Challenges: What Lighthouse Restorations Can Teach Us About Coastal Resiliency

The climate of the planet is changing and designers, engineers, and builders must change along with it. Resiliency to natural and man-made disasters is increasingly discussed in the design/build industry.

This course highlights the need for resilient buildings, and the features in windows and doors that can make them resilient, with a focus on restored lighthouses as our guide. That includes frame materials, impact resistant glazing, and proper installation.

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