Integral Crystalline Waterproofing

Few building materials have been used for centuries and offer the strength and versatility of concrete. Waterproofing concrete is critical for a functional, reputable and long-lasting structure.

This educational unit will identify the consequences of non-waterproofed concrete. In addition, the course will explore how traditional waterproofing methods are used to protect concrete. Finally, the course will examine integral crystalline waterproofing methods, as well as some case study applications.

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Beyond ADA: Multigenerational Public Restroom Design (Print Course)

Multigenerational design is a growing trend in architecture and interior design. As the United States becomes increasingly diverse, facilities must accommodate by becoming more inclusive.

The American Disabilities Act (ADA) Standards for Accessible Design were developed to outline the baseline requirements needed to make a facility accessible to people with disabilities. Although adhering to the minimum requirements of ADA can improve accessibility, exceeding these requirements to achieve multigenerational design maximizes accessibility and inclusivity.


Multigenerational design merges a number of social issues, design philosophies, and facility considerations including universal design, accessibility, specialized equipment, maintenance, sustainability, privacy, health and safety, hygiene and aging in place.

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How Toll Brothers Drives Value with Storage Solution Options

Toll Brothers, Inc. is the homebuilding industry’s number-one performer in seven out of nine categories, according to Fortune magazine. Consider, for example, a single revenue metric - the average income generated from home upgrades and site premiums. This homebuilder meets buyers’ growing desire for custom closets with an important component of the selection process: the new home’s storage systems.

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Clarifying Product Transparencies - Life Cycle Assessment, Environmental and Health Product Declarations (Print Course)

The best route to a sustainable building is knowing what’s in the materials used to build it, but questions remain among manufacturers and buyers about how to evaluate and compare the environmental profiles of similar building products and materials.

Product transparency reports like Environmental Product Declarations, Health Product Declarations and Declare labels help meet this challenge.

This course will discuss how these tools collectively provide information about the environmental performance and impact of products and offer an objective means of comparing similar products.

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Exceeding Thermal Performance Goals by Choosing Wood (Print Course)

Designing with wood offers architects the flexibility to design projects with increased insulation. From a thermal perspective, wood-frame building enclosures are inherently more efficient than steel-frame, concrete, or masonry construction.

This course will provide an understanding of how wood can help contribute to significant energy savings in the built environment.

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The Business Case for Building with Wood (Print Course)

Increasingly, building owners and design professionals are turning to wood construction to satisfy all of these industry, market, and regulatory demands and challenges. Long valued as a building material for its performance and cost advantages, today’s building owners are choosing wood to satisfy these and other value propositions, from environmental sustainability and resilience to creating distinctive buildings that appeal to the next generation of employees and apartment dwellers, all while meeting tight budgets and construction timelines.

This course looks at how wood construction can contribute to process efficiency, sustainability, and marketability.

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Wood and Evolving Codes: The 2018 IBC and Emerging Wood Technologies (Print Course)

Increasingly, designers, builders, and building owners are turning to one of our oldest building materials: wood. Valued for its versatility, low carbon footprint, and aesthetic qualities, not to mention its cost performance, wood has long been a preferred choice for constructing durable structures that are resilient in the face of hazardous conditions.

This course will look at how recent innovations and subsequent code changes are expanding the use of structural wood in nonresidential buildings.

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LEED Pilot Credit: Integrative Analysis of Building Materials

In the materials selection process, builders seek to balance numerous product performance attributes, including durability, aesthetics and health, safety and environmental impacts. Transparency and life cycle thinking are central components of a robust materials selection process, one that enables builders to choose the most appropriate materials for their project.

The U.S. Green Building Council now offers an innovative LEED pilot credit, Integrative Analysis of Building Materials, to encourage building project teams to evaluate products and materials using available life cycle information to identify those that have positive environmental, health and safety impacts. The credit informs project team decisions by providing access to information shared by building materials manufacturers on their product’s life cycle impacts.

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Welded Wire Reinforcement used in Cast-in-Place Concrete Construction

There are many advantages to using welded wire reinforcement in cast-in-place concrete construction. By using welded wire reinforcement on a project, contractors can save significantly on reinforcement placement time and costs associated with labor force allocation without compromising the designer’s structural intent.

By the end of this course, you will understand the value of welded wire reinforcement in cast-in-place concrete construction and how to bring it into the design process effectively. This information will provide you with a keen understanding of the downstream detailing methodology leveraged by the fabricator.

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The Benefits of Specifying Low-e Coatings

This course will discuss the benefits of specifying high-performance architectural glass to improve the energy efficiency of buildings while reducing their operating costs and carbon emissions. An understanding of solar energy spectrum and common glass performance measures, in addition to the manufacturing processes for pyrolytic and magnetron sputter vacuum disposition low e-coating. The course will help learners to differentiate between passive and solar control low-e coatings and different glass performance measures. Finally, the course will analyze how low-e coatings can improve energy efficiency and assist with earning LEED credit contributions.

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