Specifying Automatic Pedestrian Entryways that Support Universal Design and Exceed ADA Standards (Print Course)

Architects and designers continue to adopt and share strategies to boost universal design for doorways and entrances. Rather than aiming for minimum compliance, which is enforced by codes and ADA, these savvy building professionals are thinking about universal design and user preferences, and differentiating their buildings by leveraging appropriate technologies.

The keys to success include: *Choosing and designing appropriate entries, openings and doors for people with varied abilities. *Applying those door systems to meet and exceed all ADA requirements for entries in buildings of certain sizes. *All while complying with published building codes and standards.

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Maximizing the Design Benefits of Podium Construction (Print Course)

By the end of this course, learners will demonstrate a deeper understanding of podium structures and approaches to their design and construction. In addition, the course will examine 2018 IBC code provisions applicable to multi-story podiums. Additionally, the benefits of using timber in podium construction will be analyzed along with case studies that demonstrate the ways in which this construction typology is suited to urban infill applications.

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Concrete Restoration and Repair

The course begins by identifying the basic components of concrete, including air, cement, water, and fine aggregate or sand, and course aggregate or stone. Next, the course analyzes the causes and effects of concrete deterioration that necessitate repair. After understanding the reasons for repair, the course will provide learners with the knowledge to assess the condition of a space and the ability to engineer the appropriate solution. Finally, the course will describe concrete repair fundamentals including surface preparation, placement, and curing.

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Net Zero Energy Building Design in High Density Urban Cities

Net Zero Energy solutions suitable for urban settings will be increasingly important but there are unique policy and technical challenges to implementing these solutions in large urban buildings in hot and humid climate. Addressing these concerns could open up the possibility of achieving Positive Energy Low Rise, Zero Energy Medium Rise and Super Low Energy High Rise Buildings in the near future.

How do we overcome limited site and roof spaces for renewable energy in urban cities? How do we drive passive design for free cooling in high density environment? How do we reduce the consumption level of plug loads leveraging off the IoT? How do we use the advanced modelling approach to create designs that can achieve Net Zero Energy and then manage the delivery process so that Net Zero Energy performance? How do we move from demonstration phase projects to successful solutions for all buildings?

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Uncovering a Building’s Heartbeat Sensormatically

While energy use is a key component in building management, it is important that resource use not overshadow a building's purpose: to provide an adequate (or even enhanced) space for humans or machines to operate. Managing this interdependency between comfort and energy is not easy, but it's essential for high performance spaces as changing occupant comfort demands can consume significant amounts of energy. While optimizing each in isolation is simpler, the results could lead to less than ideal outcomes.

As managers seek to optimize both energy use and comfort, well-placed sensors and data collection systems can provide objective, useful, and actionable information. Building energy meters separated by panel, circuit, or receptacle are useful in determining, where, when, and how energy is being used. Comfort can be divided into visual, thermal, acoustic, and air quality categories. Sensors are able to measure each category in order to determine which aspects of comfort might be insufficient. Ultimately, the sensor data can be analyzed to establish linkages and tradeoffs and can lead to solutions that optimize both factors. Four different projects are presented to demonstrate how energy and comfort can be balanced at a building, campus, and program level.

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Cost-Justifying Green Buildings to Skeptics

Many are concerned about what might happen to the green building market when climate change denial is seeing a political resurgence in the US and UK. Yet there is a way to defend green buildings using a business and economics lens palatable even to the biggest green building skeptic. Long used in the world of large-cap infrastructure projects, "cost-benefit analysis" is the gold standard when it comes to weighing different design options for their Net Present Value, Life Cycle Cost, Return on Investment, etc.

Over the past year, two real estate industry leaders, Prologis and San Francisco International Airport, have recently taken that approach and improved upon it, using rigorous economic methodologies from academia and industry alike to also translate into dollar terms the non-financial value of their green building designs, including enhanced occupant health and productivity from improved IEQ and lighting, increased property value and reduced flood risk from green infrastructure, and improved community support from preserving local air and water quality.

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Sink Selection for Sustainability and Accessibility (Print Course)

This course reviews restroom design trends for commercial buildings by focusing on sink/lavatory system technology and the sustainability and accessibility trends surrounding them. The program will discuss the expanding role architects and designers play in accessible designs – striking a balance between hand washing needs and design flexibility.

The program compares a variety of sink/lavatory systems and corresponding components. It discusses how each component can enhance the sustainably of hand washing functions while still providing style within a space. Additionally the course will cover appropriate ADA, LEED and Wellness design criteria.

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Benefits of Mineral Wool as Continuous Insulation (Print Course)

Insulation can help to increase overall energy efficiency, improve occupant comfort, manage risks of mold and mildew, and even minimize the spread of fire. When designing exterior wall assemblies, the type and placement of insulation is critical. To address thermal performance, wall systems almost always feature insulation – once predominantly in the form of batts friction fit between framing members. However, batts alone have been demonstrated not to provide enough thermal resistivity for the wall.

Continuous insulation in conjunction with batt insulation in the stud cavity is now a building code requirement across the country to optimize thermal performance. Mineral wool continuous insulation is an inorganic, noncombustible solution to building energy efficient wall assemblies that protect occupants from exterior temperatures, moisture, noise, and even fire.

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Collaborating for Sustainability in Leased Space

Energy efficiency and sustainability have multiple benefits for commercial building occupants. Now, many forward-thinking corporations are employing sustainability tactics and focusing real estate strategy to attract and retain top talent, minimize operating expenses, and drive occupant comfort, health, and productivity. New technologies, a rapidly developing business case, and increasing research are making it easier for more organizations, across sectors, to leverage sustainability to capitalize on the same trends that are rapidly becoming the norm in top-of-the-market, class-A real estate. However, as tenants progress from site selection to occupancy, it becomes increasingly difficult to invest in sustainability. Tenants and landlords should collaborate early to maximize sustainability throughout the life of the tenant-landlord relationship.

In 2015, Congress passed the Energy Efficiency Improvement Act, which directed several federal agencies, including EPA and DOE to identify and employ appropriate strategies to incentivize and engage commercial landlords and tenants to collaborate towards energy efficiency. This panel will discuss the opportunities that legislation will create for tenants and corporate occupiers to leverage energy efficiency and sustainability to meet corporate social responsibility goals and earn public recognition for their success. Panelists will also introduce a variety of tools and resources that are currently available to the market.

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Design and Construction of Taller Wood Buildings (Print Course)

The properties of wood buildings, such as sustainability and a low carbon footprint; structural, thermal, acoustic, and seismic performance; and fire and life safety, are contributing to an evolution of building taller with mass timber. New materials and design strategies are enabling a centuries-old practice to address modern building concerns and technologies. Code, too, is evolving to recognize the attributes of building with wood, and the 2021 International Building Code contains new provisions for building taller wood structures. This course delves deeper into this evolution, exploring why and how to design taller wood buildings.

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