Green, Complete and Smart: Build Green vs. Grey

Communities are turning to innovative stormwater management solutions to solve local and regional stormwater challenges. For example, in the nation’s capital, DC agencies recently modified a plan that predominately relied on grey infrastructure to instead partially replace the grey infrastructure with green infrastructure in targeted existing impervious areas. These green installations will serve to mitigate flooding and stormwater issues to the same capacity but with many more environmental and community benefits.

The panel will discuss stormwater challenges through several examples located throughout the country, and the impact of vegetated systems to manage stormwater in local and regional jurisdictions. One example that will be discussed is The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) proposed Green Street Demonstration Project in the Chinatown neighborhood of Washington D.C. where the ASLA headquarters are based. The project seeks to serve as an example for such green, complete, and smart street design. The plan transforms an underperforming street corridor into a showpiece of both green infrastructure technologies and complete street approaches.

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Your Zero Net Energy Building May Destroy the Grid

With emerging standards requiring different forms of Zero Net Energy and aggressive owners developing ZNE buildings already it's an important time to look at the potential impacts net metered buildings can have on the historic grid structure and operations. High penetration of renewable energy can destabilize the grid operations and cause havoc for grid operators.

We'll provide a detailed discussion of the different definitions of ZNE and how they impact design and interaction with the grid. We'll outline current issues with high penetration of renewables on Hawaii's grid structure and how they may apply to ZNE building design for larger grid systems. We will provide building strategies that can enhance ZNE building design participation with the grid such as battery storage with renewables, demand response, thermal energy storage, and controls. Finally the team will outline ongoing changes to the grid structures and enhancements needed to prepare the grid for true ZNE buildings on a mass scale.

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Occupant Aware Buildings, or Building Aware Occupants?

As technology and intuitive interfaces enable occupants to become more aware about buildings, buildings are becoming more aware of them. Smart buildings leveraging big data collected from thousands of inexpensive sensors and the IoT, promises to improve convenience and comfort, all in a more sustainable manner. Is this a win-win?

High performance buildings with passive design strategies require engaged occupants. Training these occupants for hoped behavioral changes, is both an imperative and a challenge. Even if trained people forget or don't care, or the specific people occupying a building changes.

Does this mean ultimately your building may know more about you than you are comfortable with, even though you are more comfortable in your building? Is the next generation of high performance only possible at the expense of personal privacy? Can we count on this additional layer of systems complexity to be reliable, affordable, maintainable and secure?

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Increasing Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in Architecture (Print Course)

The under-representation of many ethnic groups in architecture translates not only to inequities within the profession, but also to missed opportunities in business. Leveraging the benefits of a diverse workforce requires a culture of inclusion and equity, one that values differences among people and ensures a culture of fairness.

This article explores the barriers that people of color face in entering the design profession, the organizations working to mitigate several of these barriers, and internal firm initiatives to create a more equitable work environment.

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RMI's Innovation Center: First-Year Lessons Learned

The Rocky Mountain Institute’s (RMI) Innovation Center illustrates the potential of achieving net-positive-energy performance in a replicable manner, serving as a demonstration project for the design and construction industry. Its first year of operation has offered many lessons around technological incorporation, financial replicability and incentivizing an integrated design process.


With four decades of leadership and advocacy for hyper-efficient buildings and economies, RMI is the ultimate client and occupant for such an innovative project. First-hand staff video interviews will address design process, system integration, performance and occupant satisfaction. RMI researchers guide attendees through the building with interactive video technology, providing commentary to frame the experience. Observations will be contextualized by members of the architecture and engineering team, translating lessons that can—and should—be applied to the next generation of high-performance buildings.

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Green Building Data: The Map to Avoiding Legal Issues

As an expert on green buildings, you are probably handling large volumes of sensitive data on green buildings & sustainable infrastructure. Some of this data may include sensitive information such as company financials, employee health statistics and building design details to aggregated and non-sensitive information such as, internal energy usage patterns and performance metrics.

What is the route that this data takes? Are there any laws which prevent its sharing? Does this data need to be destroyed at some point? Can this data be published in academic writings or industry reports of the recipient? Is the “processed data” liable to be treated differently?

This course discusses data security needs & challenges across sectors and international boundaries.

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Redefining Sustainable Design: The New AIA COTE Measures

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) Committee on the Environment (COTE) is the oldest U.S. program dedicated to sustainable design. In 1997, COTE introduced its annual Top Ten Awards, “the profession's best known recognition program for sustainable design excellence” (AIA), to celebrate exemplary projects and give the industry guidance on how to integrate green building principles. In 2015, to mark its 25th anniversary, COTE embarked on a landmark research initiative to study the first two decades of Top Ten, published in 2016 as Lessons from the Leading Edge. Part of the research was to revisit the program’s criteria of evaluation, known as the COTE Measures of Sustainable Design. The result of this effort was to overhaul the program with a completely new set of principles and metrics. The 2017 Top Ten Awards are the first year to use new criteria such as economic impact and more robust metrics for health and resilience. In this presentation, three members of the COTE Advisory Group will present the new criteria and engage the audience in a lively discussion about what defines sustainable design.

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A Model Zoning Code for Resilient Communities

This course will provide learners with an understanding of how land use codes impact resiliency through barriers and incentives. It will help you gain an understanding of the positive impact on health and productivity from codes promoting resiliency, review case studies detailing principals of natural ventilation, daylighting and onsite energy production.

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Integral Crystalline Waterproofing

Few building materials have been used for centuries and offer the strength and versatility of concrete. Waterproofing concrete is critical for a functional, reputable and long-lasting structure.

This educational unit will identify the consequences of non-waterproofed concrete. In addition, the course will explore how traditional waterproofing methods are used to protect concrete. Finally, the course will examine integral crystalline waterproofing methods, as well as some case study applications.

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Beyond ADA: Multigenerational Public Restroom Design (Print Course)

Multigenerational design is a growing trend in architecture and interior design. As the United States becomes increasingly diverse, facilities must accommodate by becoming more inclusive.

The American Disabilities Act (ADA) Standards for Accessible Design were developed to outline the baseline requirements needed to make a facility accessible to people with disabilities. Although adhering to the minimum requirements of ADA can improve accessibility, exceeding these requirements to achieve multigenerational design maximizes accessibility and inclusivity.


Multigenerational design merges a number of social issues, design philosophies, and facility considerations including universal design, accessibility, specialized equipment, maintenance, sustainability, privacy, health and safety, hygiene and aging in place.

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