Enduring Beauty: High Performing Polymer Cladding Systems

This On Demand CEU is a recorded presentation from a previously live webinar event. This course encourages participants to think outside the box and consider using polymer cladding as a material to create aesthetic, enduring, and moisture resistant rainscreens that will better protect buildings and its occupants. We will discuss other more commonly used products and the issues faced with each. We will also consider life cycle costs of various cladding options, including polymer. Finally, participants will leave with a thorough understanding of how to install polymer extrusions as cladding. We will explore doing so on different substrates, detailing around openings, transitions between differing cladding materials and how to handle joints between cladding components with the goal of using polymer as a resource to promote health, safety, and welfare of both people and the environment.

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Chemistry in Context: Materials Science in Building and Construction

Architecture, Engineering, and Construction (AEC) professionals are asked to make informed materials decisions on an almost-daily basis – decisions which call for a foundational understanding of how those materials are made and their potential impact on the building’s health, sustainability and resiliency. This course will help architects, engineers, designers, and contractors navigate the complexity of materials selection by providing an overview of the role of chemistry in enhancing the product and building performance. The course will provide a review of key methodologies for measuring benefits and relevant information to help inform product selection. Further, it will provide a primer on how chemicals are regulated in the marketplace.

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Daylighting with Light-Transmitting Polycarbonate for Roofing and Facades

Daylighting has already been proven to increase a building’s energy efficiency and occupant well-being. Material choice matters. This course will explore the role of daylighting as part of sustainable project design and how to maximize the availability of natural light.

Substantial attention will be given to the role of polycarbonates in daylighting strategy, including product choices and applications. Case studies are also included and examine the use of polycarbonates in various daylighting settings, ranging from a five-year comparative study to an internationally renowned sports stadium, higher education, and a condo in Florida.

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Natural Slate Rainscreen Cladding Systems

Natural slate is long–lived, durable, fire resistant and waterproof. This revolution in cladding applications offers a modern, sustainable and easy to install alternative with unique character.

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Specifying Western Red Cedar: Sustainable Building Products

Western Red Cedar (WRC) aesthetic, economic, and environmental benefits are just some of the reasons why builders and designers are increasingly gravitating to this species of wood. Presented here are modern, historical, and cultural uses of western red cedar, as well as its performance characteristics, grade specification, and finishes. Also discussed are sustainable forest management practices and certification agencies, and how sustainably sourced wood can contribute to LEED® credits.

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Sustainable and Renewable Coastal Softwood Timbers – The Environmental Choice

Western red cedar (WRC) is a widely popular softwood species throughout North America for use in residential and commercial buildings, but there are other important sustainable and renewable coastal softwood species you should know about. Yellow cedar, western hemlock (hem-fir), and Douglas fir have similar performance characteristics and can be used in the same applications as western red cedar. This course will discuss where these species grow, their identifiable characteristics, and where to use coastal softwood appearance lumber in green building projects. We will also explore how these coastal softwood species are a highly sustainable and renewable product that should be considered for use in sustainable design.

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Concrete Pathways to Net Zero: Part 1, Embodied Carbon (Print Course)

For years, much of the architecture, engineering, and construction community has been focused on reducing operational carbon. More recently, the detrimental effects of embodied carbon emissions on the environment have become pronounced, and nations, organizations, and individuals are turning their attention to the ways in which embodied carbon can be reduced or eliminated.

This course analyzes concrete’s role in achieving net zero carbon emissions by assessing material innovation, the impact of prescriptive and performance specifications on the environment, and the use of whole building life cycle assessments to reduce the carbon footprint of buildings.

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Modern Architectural Benefits and Design Considerations of Molded Brick (Print Course)

Learners will understand the role of brick in construction and design, as well as its benefits and contemporary applications. An overview of the manufacturing process and sustainability properties will be discussed, followed by a thorough review of ASTM brick standards and classifications. The course will provide an understanding of brick sizes, shapes, and orientation, and recommendations for specifying and designing with brick.

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Environmental Performance of Redwood Lumber

Webinar On-Demand: This On Demand CEU is a recorded presentation from a previously live webinar event. This course offers insight into the environmental performance of Redwood Lumber. The details and results of a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) comparing Redwood and plastic/composite decking options will be shared as will information about Redwood’s Environmental Product Declaration (EPD). The course also provides comparisons between Redwood Lumber and other wood species, as well as details about the sustainability of modern Redwood forestry management practices. Finally, this course provides details on important product attributes of Redwood Lumber including grades, fire performance, strength, and finishing options among others.

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How to Calculate the Wood Carbon Footprint of a Building (Print Course)

Are we able to dive deeper into these numbers to find ways to reduce a building’s carbon footprint in meaningful ways? What are the methods used to measure building material carbon footprint and do they tell the whole story? Are there simple tools to assess material choices? This course seeks to address these and other questions by explaining the principal methods and tools that are used to assess carbon footprint in the context of building materials.

It includes a primer on product terminology, including life cycle assessment (LCA), environmental product declarations (EPDs), carbon footprint, embodied carbon, and whole building LCA (WBLCA) tools. It explains how biogenic carbon is treated in standard LCA methodology and dives into the forest side of the equation, explaining basics of the sustainable forestry cycle. This course also highlights some ways to track and assure wood comes from sustainable forests in North America and why demand for wood products supports investment in forest management.

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