Specifying Automatic Pedestrian Entryways that Support Universal Design and Exceed ADA Standards (Print Course)

Architects and designers continue to adopt and share strategies to boost universal design for doorways and entrances. Rather than aiming for minimum compliance, which is enforced by codes and ADA, these savvy building professionals are thinking about universal design and user preferences, and differentiating their buildings by leveraging appropriate technologies.

The keys to success include: *Choosing and designing appropriate entries, openings and doors for people with varied abilities. *Applying those door systems to meet and exceed all ADA requirements for entries in buildings of certain sizes. *All while complying with published building codes and standards.

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Designing Building Spaces that Integrate Building Design and the Outdoors with Oversized Fenestration Products (Print Course)

Finding ways to bring the outdoors inside is a modern building design trend that continues to influence the specification process. Consumers’ desire to blend nature with the built environment incorporates a desire to increase the amount of natural lighting and nature inside the home or commercial space.

Research continues to evolve demonstrating the need for nature to be incorporated in the built environment, not simply as a luxury, but as an investment in health and productivity. Mounting pressure for building and design professionals to not only meet LEED standards and current codes, but exceed them, continues to leverage the need for sustainability, green building manufacturing, and products that address the needs and wants of the consumer.

Up until recently, it can be said that only luxury markets could afford the type of oversized windows and doors that permit the most amount of sunlight due to intricate design, complicated installation, and maintenance of oversized windows and doors. However, new products on the market are making this design and lifestyle trend more accessible and with more choices than ever.

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NFPA 285: A Focus on Assemblies (Print Course)

In this course, learners will be able to better understand NFPA compliance – from determining what needs tested to the testing procedures themselves. Other codes and tests related to fire safety will be reviewed as well. Different types of cladding and insulation will be examined in terms of materials, components, and fire safety. Finally, two fire case studies will be presented so that learners can evaluate the performance of those buildings.

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Space Planning for a New Generation: Using BIM Software to Understand and Accommodate the Millennial Market (Print Course)

The way that people live is evolving, and it is important that AEC industry professionals are able to adjust their designs to better serve a new generation.

This course will help designers cater to a younger generation that is interested in maximizing smaller spaces, bringing elements of nature into urban settings, and communicating with technology.

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Redefining Sustainable Design: The New AIA COTE Measures

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) Committee on the Environment (COTE) is the oldest U.S. program dedicated to sustainable design. In 1997, COTE introduced its annual Top Ten Awards, “the profession's best known recognition program for sustainable design excellence” (AIA), to celebrate exemplary projects and give the industry guidance on how to integrate green building principles. In 2015, to mark its 25th anniversary, COTE embarked on a landmark research initiative to study the first two decades of Top Ten, published in 2016 as Lessons from the Leading Edge. Part of the research was to revisit the program’s criteria of evaluation, known as the COTE Measures of Sustainable Design. The result of this effort was to overhaul the program with a completely new set of principles and metrics. The 2017 Top Ten Awards are the first year to use new criteria such as economic impact and more robust metrics for health and resilience. In this presentation, three members of the COTE Advisory Group will present the new criteria and engage the audience in a lively discussion about what defines sustainable design.

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A Model Zoning Code for Resilient Communities

This course will provide learners with an understanding of how land use codes impact resiliency through barriers and incentives. It will help you gain an understanding of the positive impact on health and productivity from codes promoting resiliency, review case studies detailing principals of natural ventilation, daylighting and onsite energy production.

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Beyond ADA: Multigenerational Public Restroom Design (Print Course)

Multigenerational design is a growing trend in architecture and interior design. As the United States becomes increasingly diverse, facilities must accommodate by becoming more inclusive.

The American Disabilities Act (ADA) Standards for Accessible Design were developed to outline the baseline requirements needed to make a facility accessible to people with disabilities. Although adhering to the minimum requirements of ADA can improve accessibility, exceeding these requirements to achieve multigenerational design maximizes accessibility and inclusivity.


Multigenerational design merges a number of social issues, design philosophies, and facility considerations including universal design, accessibility, specialized equipment, maintenance, sustainability, privacy, health and safety, hygiene and aging in place.

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Clarifying Product Transparencies - Life Cycle Assessment, Environmental and Health Product Declarations (Print Course)

The best route to a sustainable building is knowing what’s in the materials used to build it, but questions remain among manufacturers and buyers about how to evaluate and compare the environmental profiles of similar building products and materials.

Product transparency reports like Environmental Product Declarations, Health Product Declarations and Declare labels help meet this challenge.

This course will discuss how these tools collectively provide information about the environmental performance and impact of products and offer an objective means of comparing similar products.

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The Business Case for Building with Wood (Print Course)

Increasingly, building owners and design professionals are turning to wood construction to satisfy all of these industry, market, and regulatory demands and challenges. Long valued as a building material for its performance and cost advantages, today’s building owners are choosing wood to satisfy these and other value propositions, from environmental sustainability and resilience to creating distinctive buildings that appeal to the next generation of employees and apartment dwellers, all while meeting tight budgets and construction timelines.

This course looks at how wood construction can contribute to process efficiency, sustainability, and marketability.

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Wood and Evolving Codes: The 2018 IBC and Emerging Wood Technologies (Print Course)

Increasingly, designers, builders, and building owners are turning to one of our oldest building materials: wood. Valued for its versatility, low carbon footprint, and aesthetic qualities, not to mention its cost performance, wood has long been a preferred choice for constructing durable structures that are resilient in the face of hazardous conditions.

This course will look at how recent innovations and subsequent code changes are expanding the use of structural wood in nonresidential buildings.

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