Specifying FSC Certified Wood for Sustainable Projects

As a designer, it is crucial to know where the wood you specify for projects comes from to ensure the wood is responsibly harvested. This course will help you to speak knowledgeably about FSC requirements and credits that can be earned for projects seeking green building certifications.

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Green, Complete and Smart: Build Green vs. Grey

Communities are turning to innovative stormwater management solutions to solve local and regional stormwater challenges. For example, in the nation’s capital, DC agencies recently modified a plan that predominately relied on grey infrastructure to instead partially replace the grey infrastructure with green infrastructure in targeted existing impervious areas. These green installations will serve to mitigate flooding and stormwater issues to the same capacity but with many more environmental and community benefits.

The panel will discuss stormwater challenges through several examples located throughout the country, and the impact of vegetated systems to manage stormwater in local and regional jurisdictions. One example that will be discussed is The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) proposed Green Street Demonstration Project in the Chinatown neighborhood of Washington D.C. where the ASLA headquarters are based. The project seeks to serve as an example for such green, complete, and smart street design. The plan transforms an underperforming street corridor into a showpiece of both green infrastructure technologies and complete street approaches.

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Occupant Aware Buildings, or Building Aware Occupants?

As technology and intuitive interfaces enable occupants to become more aware about buildings, buildings are becoming more aware of them. Smart buildings leveraging big data collected from thousands of inexpensive sensors and the IoT, promises to improve convenience and comfort, all in a more sustainable manner. Is this a win-win?

High performance buildings with passive design strategies require engaged occupants. Training these occupants for hoped behavioral changes, is both an imperative and a challenge. Even if trained people forget or don't care, or the specific people occupying a building changes.

Does this mean ultimately your building may know more about you than you are comfortable with, even though you are more comfortable in your building? Is the next generation of high performance only possible at the expense of personal privacy? Can we count on this additional layer of systems complexity to be reliable, affordable, maintainable and secure?

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Rubber Reimagined – Recycled Rubber Flooring Provides Maximum Durability in High-Traffic Museum Projects

Museum collections are supremely important to our culture, whether they represent rich art, history, or science, so the building materials used in museum projects must be of the highest quality, both structurally and environmentally. Indoor air quality, wayfinding, comfort, and maintenance are important considerations for these high-traffic environments.

This course will demonstrate why recycled rubber flooring is an excellent option for museum flooring, and will cover performance attributes, design options, interior applications, and installation considerations. In addition, the course will explore three case studies where recycled rubber flooring was used in institutional and museum projects in the United States and Canada.

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Designing Restrooms for Sustainable Operation (Print Course)

Designing restrooms for sustainable operation requires unique strategies beyond those typically associated with green building. This course does not discuss the details of LEED certification or environmentally responsible materials and related documentation. Instead, the focus of this course will be to educate architects and designers on operational approaches that encourage sustainable restroom project design.

Thoughtful product specification considers energy costs, battery usage, waste, and usage of consumables that in turn allow the architect or designer the opportunity to educate the client on the benefits and incentives that sustainable design creates for both building owners and occupants. While architects and building designers who specify sustainable design products must take into consideration the economical investment necessary from the client, specifying for sustainable operation allows a restroom to operate both sustainably and cost-effectively while retaining the architect’s aesthetic vision.

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Why Exceed the Code: Maximizing Energy and Cost Savings in Pipe Insulation

Thermal insulation aids in stabilizing process temperatures; can minimize moisture condensation on below ambient temperature piping surfaces; increases fire protection; and contributes to noise abatement. Personnel protection against burn injury is a major benefit from thermal insulation. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires that “all exposed steam and hot-water pipes within 7 feet of the floor or working platform or within 15 inches measured horizontally from stairways, ramps, or fixed ladders shall be covered with an insulating material, or guarded in such manner as to prevent contact. In addition, the Insulation Institute provides other succinct reasons for insulating pipes beyond many current state and local code thickness requirements.

ASHRAE 90.1 minimum pipe insulation thicknesses are required for compliance with energy-efficient building design relative to many new buildings, building additions, and retrofit construction. A vapor retarder, which is required in addition to the insulation, will further reduce the likelihood of corrosion due to condensation on cold pipes. Finally, while insulation cannot prevent standing water in pipes from freezing, it can slow the process. This course will enable learners to analyze material types that may ultimately affect the long-term safety and wellness of occupants. By thoroughly examining ASHRAE 90.1, the need for building professionals to exceed the local code requirements will become apparent. Finally, the course will focus on utilizing software to specify pipe insulation, which will influence the project budget, energy-efficiency of a structure, and the long-term safety and wellness of occupants.

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Green Building Data: The Map to Avoiding Legal Issues

As an expert on green buildings, you are probably handling large volumes of sensitive data on green buildings & sustainable infrastructure. Some of this data may include sensitive information such as company financials, employee health statistics and building design details to aggregated and non-sensitive information such as, internal energy usage patterns and performance metrics.

What is the route that this data takes? Are there any laws which prevent its sharing? Does this data need to be destroyed at some point? Can this data be published in academic writings or industry reports of the recipient? Is the “processed data” liable to be treated differently?

This course discusses data security needs & challenges across sectors and international boundaries.

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Redefining Sustainable Design: The New AIA COTE Measures

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) Committee on the Environment (COTE) is the oldest U.S. program dedicated to sustainable design. In 1997, COTE introduced its annual Top Ten Awards, “the profession's best known recognition program for sustainable design excellence” (AIA), to celebrate exemplary projects and give the industry guidance on how to integrate green building principles. In 2015, to mark its 25th anniversary, COTE embarked on a landmark research initiative to study the first two decades of Top Ten, published in 2016 as Lessons from the Leading Edge. Part of the research was to revisit the program’s criteria of evaluation, known as the COTE Measures of Sustainable Design. The result of this effort was to overhaul the program with a completely new set of principles and metrics. The 2017 Top Ten Awards are the first year to use new criteria such as economic impact and more robust metrics for health and resilience. In this presentation, three members of the COTE Advisory Group will present the new criteria and engage the audience in a lively discussion about what defines sustainable design.

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Propane Tankless Water Heating in Commercial Building Applications, Efficiency and Performance Benefits

Water heating is a major energy end-use in commercial buildings and is very significant in certain commercial building types. Many commercial building owners and operators have a critical need for water heating systems which are reliable, able to meet varying levels of demand, energy efficient, and able to fit within a building’s space constraints in order to maintain their business operations. Propane tankless water heaters are a flexible, energy-efficient technology which provides these attributes in many commercial applications.

This course will explore how commercial buildings use energy and the potential application of propane tankless systems to provide a solution for water heating needs.

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A Model Zoning Code for Resilient Communities

This course will provide learners with an understanding of how land use codes impact resiliency through barriers and incentives. It will help you gain an understanding of the positive impact on health and productivity from codes promoting resiliency, review case studies detailing principals of natural ventilation, daylighting and onsite energy production.

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